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Lot 134

2015   |   Scottsdale Auctions 2015

1933 Ford Roadster

SOLD $242,000

Estimate

$125,000 - $175,000| Without Reserve

Chassis

263309

Car Highlights

High-Quality Restoration by Noted Expert Craftsmen
Well-Known So-Cal Period Hot Rod
Featured in Hop Up (1953) and Street Rodder(2003)
Purchased New and Modified by Harry Warner
Accompanied by a Wayne 12-Port Engine

Technical Specs

292 CC OHV L-Head V-8 Engine with Ardun Cylinder Heads
Triple Stromberg “97” 2-Barrel Carburetors
Estimated 225 BHP
3-Speed Manual Transmission
4-Wheel Hydraulic Drum Brakes
Dropped Solid Front Axle with Leaf Springs
Live Rear Axle with Semi-Elliptical Leaf Springs

Saleroom Addendum

*Please note this vehicle is titled 18263309.

Register to Bid

Boasting impeccable styling, uprated V-8 engines, and an improved chassis, the 1933 Ford line provided a perfect canvas for early hot-rodders. This famous example is an excellent case in point, with extensive So-Cal history.

Purchased new by Harry Warner in Chicago and used on his honeymoon, this ’33 Ford Roadster was first modified in 1940, the year Harry began work at California’s Lockheed Aircraft. There, Harry met Wayne Horning, with whom he formed Wayne Manufacturing, the famed 12-port cylinder head company. A rolling engine test bed and virtual fixture at speed trials and drag strips during the late 1940s and early 1950s, Harry’s ’33 served the Warners and evolved through several configurations prior to its 1970s retirement. The ’33 eventually passed to Harry’s son Dan, and then to Bill Swanson in 1994, with such renowned craftsmen as Art Hernandez, Art Chrisman, and Pete Eastwood participating in its 10-year restoration. As a nod to its history, Swanson chose a Flathead V-8 with three Stromberg carbs and Ardun overhead-valve heads. The consignor acquired the roadster in early 2003, and, now, it is accompanied by a 12-port Wayne-head inline “six”, plus an original dash and correspondence. Featured in films and numerous publications, Harry Warner’s ’33 Roadster is an irreplaceable part of California car culture.