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Private Sale

1934 Ford V8 Station Wagon

Asking Price: $85,000

Asking Price

$85,000

Chassis

18-1003657

Car Highlights

An Astonishingly Original Early Flathead V8 Woodie
Abounding with Factory Original Finishes and Materials
Formerly a Part of the Famed Nick Alexander Woodie Collection
Held by Just Three California Owners for Its First 75 Years
Unrestored, Retaining Irreplaceable Character and Charm
Register to Bid

David Gooding

With the addition of the flathead V-8 to the venerable Ford product line in 1932, Henry Ford’s more utilitarian offerings became considerably more capable machines, providing his customers with boundless opportunities for adventure further afield than ever before. Ford’s wooden-bodied station wagons were a resounding success and, by 1934, were a part of all facets of American life.

This 1934 V8 Station Wagon is likely one of the most intact and original examples extant. According to one account, this Woodie was sold new to a resident of an exclusive enclave of Santa Barbara, California. It was chauffeur operated and maintained, and remained with the original family for approximately 35 years. In the late 1960s, already an unusually well-preserved example, the Woodie was acquired by an early Ford authority in Altadena, California, and was warehoused for a further 40 years.

In 2007, the Ford, by then claiming true time-capsule status with its original finishes appearing intact, was purchased by noted Woodie preservationist and historian Nick Alexander, and would become an important piece of his massive Ford Woodie collection. The original wood was carefully re-varnished and the paint, chrome, and roof material, believed to be original, carefully preserved. Inside, the upholstery, painted metal dash, and front rubber mat, appear original as well and display an irreplaceable patina with several splits in the fabric and seams. The engine bay and undercarriage likewise show the passage of time, but are perfectly in keeping with an unrestored, well-respected machine. In 2009, the Station Wagon was acquired by the consignor and has since received expert care and sparing use. As one of the last of its kind to exist at a preservation level, and likely impossible to replace, this Woodie is deserving of special admiration and consideration.