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Lot 70

2014   |   Amelia Island Auction 2014

1969 Ferrari Dino 206 GT

Coachwork by Designed by Pininfarina Coachwork by Scaglietti

SOLD $638,000

Estimate

$475,000 - $550,000

Chassis

00378

Car Highlights

A Rare and Important Ferrari Model
One of Only 153 Examples Ever Built
Lightweight Alloy Coachwork with Distinctive Features
Finished in Classic Factory-Delivered Color Scheme
A California Car Since the Late 1970s
Very Original Unrestored Condition
Never Restored, Shown, or Offered for Public Sale
Documented by Ferrari Historian Marcel Massini

Technical Specs

1,987 CC DOHC Tipo 135B Alloy V-6 Engine
Three Weber 40 DCN F/1 Carburetors
180 BHP at 8,000 RPM
5-Speed Manual Transaxle
4-Wheel Girling Ventilated Disc Brakes
4-Wheel Independent-Wishbone Suspension with Coil Springs and Shock Absorbers

Saleroom Addendum

*Please note that this car is titled as DINO206G1000378.

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The 206 GT

The story of Ferrari’s first mid-engine production car begins at the 1965 Paris Motor Show, where Carrozzeria Pininfarina unveiled the dramatic Dino Berlinetta Speciale concept. Based on a competition 206 SP chassis, the Dino Berlinetta Speciale demonstrated that a road-going, mid-engine Ferrari was a real possibility, and the spectacular design study introduced styling cues that were eventually incorporated into a variety of Ferrari models throughout the 1960s and 1970s.

After the initial Dino Berlinetta GT prototype was completed in December 1966, series production of the 206 GT began in June 1968 and came to a close in April 1969, when the 246 GT was introduced.

Undoubtedly the most distinctive Dino model, the original 206 GT possesses many unique aesthetic and mechanical characteristics. At a glance, a 206 GT can be distinguished from its more common brethren by its knock-off Cromadora wheels, wood-rimmed steering wheel, chrome-plated locking fuel-filler cap, narrow exhaust tips, exterior lighting, and special interior appointments. Constructed on a 2,280 mm wheelbase, the 206 GT featured exquisite alloy coachwork and a two-liter alloy V-6, contributing to a curb weight of less than 2,000 lbs.

Not only did the original 206 GT establish a new direction for road-going Ferraris, it also attracted a diverse clientele of car enthusiasts, from General Motors designer Bill Mitchell to legendary musician Eric Clapton.

In total, Ferrari built just 153 examples of the 206 GT, a miniscule fraction of the total production of 4,067 Dinos. Contributing further to the 206 GT’s rarity is the model’s astonishingly low rate of survival, as it is estimated that 25%–30% of the original production run has been irretrievably lost.

This Car

Constructed in February 1969, this 206 GT, chassis 00378, was the 140th example of just 153 units ever built.

As completed by Carrozzeria Scaglietti, the alloy-bodied Dino was finished in the classic livery of Rosso Chiaro (20-R-190) with the interior upholstered in long-grain Skai (artificial leather) supplied by Stabilimenti di Brandizzo of Torino. As was the case with the vast majority of 206 GTs, chassis 00378 was originally sold through Ferrari’s extensive network of local dealerships to an Italian owner.

In the 1970s, the Dino was exported to the US, and, by 1979, it had come into the hands of Patrick Midglen, an architect living in Woodside, California. Mr. Midglen retained the Dino for almost 20 years before selling it to another Bay Area enthusiast.

Having resided in the care of just two long-term owners over the past 35 years, this exceptionally rare Dino is virtually unknown to the Ferrari community, and it has never been shown, restored, or offered for public sale. With the exception of being repainted in the original color, 00378 appears to be a very correct and original example throughout. Not only does this car retain its original interior, it is offered with a partial factory tool kit and jack, as well as a history report compiled by Marcel Massini.

For decades now, these limited-production, alloy-bodied Dinos have maintained a dedicated following among knowledgeable enthusiasts. Today, they are considered a “must have” for any serious Ferrari collection and are the ideal Dino model to round out a stable of thoroughbred sports cars. As a result of their prized status and exceptional rarity, opportunities to acquire a genuine 206 GT are few and far between.

In all respects, this well-kept 206 GT is a superb example of one of the most iconic, influential and beloved Italian sports cars of the 1960s. For the collector who has been searching for an important Dino with special qualities, this 206 GT is a true prize.