loader

Lot 152

2014   |   Pebble Beach Auctions 2014

1992 AAR/Toyota Eagle Mk III GTP

SOLD $1,045,000

Estimate

$700,000 - $1,000,000

Chassis

WFO-004

Car Highlights

Most Dominant Prototype in US Racing History
Winner of 14 of 23 Races Entered
1992 and 1993 IMSA GTP Champion with Juan Manuel Fangio II
1992 and 1993 Winner of the 12 Hours of Sebring Endurance Race
Gifted to Juan Manuel Fangio II by Toyota
Designed and Built by the Legendary All American Racers

Technical Specs

2,100 CC Turbocharged DOHC Inline 4-Cylinder TRD Engine
Pectel/TRD Electronic Fuel Injection
700 HP with 52 MM Restrictor (1992), 750 HP with 54 MM Restrictor (1993)
5-Speed March-Based Transaxle
4-Wheel Vented Hydraulic Disc Brakes (Carbon Discs Used in 1992)
Front and Rear Independent, Unequal-Length Double Wishbones, Bell-Crank Pushrod, Four-Way Adjustable Shocks with Co-Axial Springs, and Driver-Adjustable Anti-Roll Bar

Saleroom Addendum

*Please note this car will be sold on a bill of sale.

Register to Bid

From the Collection of Juan Manuel Fangio IIToyota Motor CompanyJuan Manuel Fangio II (gifted from the above)

Race: Daytona, February 2, 1992, Car #99, Driver(s): Fangio II/Wallace/Acheson, Placement: 11thRace: Miami, February 23, 1992, Car #99, Driver(s): Fangio II, Placement: DNF, engineRace: Sebring, March 21, 1992, Car #99, Driver(s): Fangio II/Wallace, Placement: 1stRace: Phoenix, April 10, 1992, Car #99, Driver(s): Fangio II, Placement: 1stRace: Road Atlanta, April 26, 1992, Car #99, Driver(s): Fangio II, Placement: 14thRace: Lime Rock, May 25, 1992, Car #99, Driver(s): Fangio II, Placement: 1stRace: Mid-Ohio, May 31, 1992, Car #99, Driver(s): Fangio II, Placement: 2ndRace: New Orleans, June 14, 1992, Car #99, Driver(s): Fangio II, Placement: 1stRace: Watkins Glen, June 28, 1992, Car #99, Driver(s): Fangio II, Placement: 1stRace: Laguna Seca, July 19, 1992, Car #99, Driver(s): Fangio II, Placement: 1stRace: Portland, July 26, 1992, Car #99, Driver(s): Fangio II, Placement: 2ndRace: Road America, August 9, 1992, Car #99, Driver(s): Fangio II, Placement: 1stRace: Del Mar, October 11, 1992, Car #99, Driver(s): Fangio II, Placement: DNF, head gasketRace: Daytona, January 31, 1993, Car #99, Driver(s): Fangio II/Wallace/Acheson, Placement: DNF, engineRace: Miami, February 21, 1993, Car #99, Driver(s): Fangio II, Placement: 1stRace: Sebring, March 20, 1993, Car #99, Driver(s): Fangio II/Wallace, Placement: 1stRace: Road Atlanta, April 18, 1993, Car #99, Driver(s): Fangio II, Placement: 1stRace: Lime Rock, May 31, 1993, Car #99, Driver(s): Fangio II, Placement: 1stRace: Mid-Ohio, June 13, 1993, Car #99, Driver(s): Fangio II, Placement: 1stRace: Watkins Glen, June 27, 1993, Car #99, Driver(s): Fangio II, Placement: 1stRace: Laguna Seca, July 25, 1993, Car #99, Driver(s): Fangio II, Placement: 2ndRace: Portland, August 1, 1993, Car #99, Driver(s): Fangio II, Placement: 1stRace: Phoenix, October 2, 1993, Car #99, Driver(s): Fangio II, Placement: 2nd

All American Racers, or AAR, was founded in 1965 by two titans of the auto-racing world: Dan Gurney and Carroll Shelby. Bound by a desire to not only race, but also produce racing cars that could take on the worlds best, the two friends went on to achieve many successes together, including the first and only Grand Prix win by an American driver in a car of his own construction – a record that still stands. While Gurney bought Shelby out of his share of AAR in 1970, the company has continued to be at the fore of auto-racing technology for over five decades and thrives today with Gurney at the helm.

AAR was hired by Toyota to make an assault on the IMSA GTO classification in 1986 with a Toyota Celica of AAR’s design and construction. The program resulted in a championship in 1987, and the two partners would stay together for a total of eight very successful years. Toyota’s decision to move to IMSA’s GTP division for the 1989 season wrought the Eagle HF89, which was the first prototype that AAR had produced. The HF89 went on to moderate levels of success in 1989 and 1990, with the car winning four times.

Another addition made at this time was to add Juan Manuel Fangio II to the team as a driver. Fangio, the nephew of the five-time Formula 1 champion driver Juan Manuel Fangio, was to become a significant force in GTP racing for the Toyota team.

In 1991, it was decided that a new car was necessary to match the might of series stalwarts Nissan and Jaguar. Hiro Fujimori and John Ward of AAR were tasked with producing an all-conquering car using Toyota’s venerable 2.1-liter four-cylinder engine. The clean-sheet design became known as the Eagle Mk III and would go on to become a revolutionary and stunningly effective weapon for Toyota. Using aerodynamic techniques never executed on a prototype, the Mk III produced amazing amounts of downforce while keeping its drag through the air as minimal as possible. The chassis was made from carbon fiber, a first for AAR, and the bodywork was carbon and aluminum honeycomb – all state-of-the-art for the time. The engineers at TRD, led by Drino Miller, were able to squeeze well over 700 hp from the diminutive Toyota engine using a new engine-management system.

Upon its debut in late 1991, the Eagle Mk III was a stunning car to drive, with Juan Manuel Fangio II saying the car had “excellent balance.” Victories came starting at Portland, Oregon, which would start an era of dominance never before seen, nor repeated. Over the period from late 1991 through the end of the 1993 season, the Eagle Mk III would win 21 of the 27 races it entered, including 17 in a row. The team brought home two Camel GT drivers titles for Juan Manuel Fangio II and two IMSA GTP Manufacturer crowns for Toyota.

This car, chassis 004, was Fangio II’s mount for the entirety of the 1992 and 1993 seasons (chassis 001 was used in 1991). Fangio II drove chassis 004 in 23 races, claiming victory on 14 occasions, six of which were consecutive. Importantly, two of Fangio II’s wins came at the 1992 and 1993 12 Hours of Sebring, both times co-driving with Andy Wallace.

As a show of gratitude, chassis 004 was subsequently gifted to Fangio II by Toyota and has remained in his care ever since. It spent many years being displayed in Museo Fangio in Balcarce, Argentina, next to many of the cars that his uncle, known as “Il Maestro” made famous throughout his incredible career. The car is now presented in complete, running condition for those who appreciate the significant role this car played in American motor racing history. It is suggested that the car receive comprehensive re-commissioning for track use after its significant time in storage.

As a record-setting factory effort, designed and built by Dan Gurney’s team at AAR, driven and still owned by a stunningly accomplished driver and nephew of a legend, this 1992 AAR Eagle GTP is in an elite class of racing cars that changed the landscape in which they competed. It deserves your closest consideration.